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Satellite Supported

G eostationary

FY-2

FY-2A is the first geostationary spin-stabilized meteorological satellite from China. The main function of FY-2A is observation, taking visible, infrared and water vapor disk images of Earth hourly.

GOES-10

GOES10 satellite provides continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It circles the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, thus allowing it to hover continuously over one position on Earth's surface.

GOES-11

GOES11 satellite provides continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It circles the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, thus allowing it to hover continuously over one position on Earth's surface.

GOES-12

GOES12 satellite provides continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. It circles the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, thus allowing it to hover continuously over one position on Earth's surface.

MTSAT

MTSAT will be the next Japanese weather satellite for geosynchronous orbit. It will be a three-axis stabilized spacecraft carrying both a meteorological and aeronautical communication mission.

MSG-1/METEOSAT-8

EUMETSAT's MSG satellite carries a 12-channel spinning Imager called SEVIRI, with a 1 km resolution visible band and 3 km resolution infrared bands, 8 of which are in the thermal infrared.

MSG-2

MSG2 is the second new generation satellite in a series of four to be boosted into geostationary orbit. It will weigh over 2,000 kilograms at launch and will have a design life of seven years. It is fitted with 12 imaging channels, and will deliver an image every 15 minutes in the visible, infrared and water vapor wavelengths.

P olar O rbiting

NOAA-12

NOAA-12 (NOAA-D before launch) is a third-generation operational meteorological satellite for use in the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS).

NOAA-14

NOAA-14 continued the third-generation operational, Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series operated by the National Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA-14 was in a morning equator-crossing orbit and was intended to replace the NOAA 12 (NOAA-D) as the prime morning spacecraft.

NOAA-16

NOAA 16 will be in a morning equator-crossing orbit, intended to replace the NOAA-J as the prime morning spacecraft. The goal of the NOAA/NESS polar orbiting program is to provide output products used in meteorological prediction and warning, oceanographic and hydrologic services, and space environment monitoring.

NOAA-17

NOAA 17 will collect meteorological data and transmit the information to users around the world to enhance weather forecasting. In the United States, the data will be used primarily by NOAA's National Weather Service for its long-range weather and climate forecasts.

NOAA-18

NOAA-18 continues the series of NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) with improved imaging and sounding capabilities that collect data around the world. It replaces NOAA-16 and joins NOAA-17. As it orbits the globe, capturing valuable environmental data, NOAA-18 will help drive NOAA's long-range climate and seasonal outlooks, including forecasts for El Niño and La Niña.

FY-1

Chinese (PRC) weather monitoring satellite operated in a Sun-synchronous orbit. It carries scanning radiometers to monitor cloud coverage and ocean colors temperatures.

Terra

Terra is a multi-national, multi-displinary satellite carrying a payload of five remote sensors which together, measures comprehensively the state of Earth's environment and ongoing changes in its climate system.

Aqua

Latin for water, is a NASA Earth Science satellite mission named for the large amount of information that the mission will be collecting about the Earth's water cycle, including evaporation from the oceans, water vapor in the atmosphere, clouds, precipitation, soil moisture, sea ice, land ice, and snow cover on the land and ice.

MetOp

Launched in October 2006, MetOp-A, the first satellite in the series, will replace one of two satellite services currently operated by NOAA and will be Europe’s first polar-orbiting satellite dedicated to operational meteorology.